Woops, sent this as a personal reply, not to the list. Full message is quoted below.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2010/9/4 Bjarni Rúnar Einarsson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bre@beanstalks-project.net">bre@beanstalks-project.net</a>&gt;</span><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">2010/9/4 paxcoder <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:paxcoder@gmail.com" target="_blank">paxcoder@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br>
<div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>On 09/04/2010 05:22 PM, Bjarni Rúnar Einarsson wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
Generally people seem to be assuming a dynamic DNS provider will be used in conjunction with these boxes, I am pretty sure at least some of them will manage MX records for you as well. Maybe even dynamically, which will let the box do the work.<br>


</blockquote>
<br></div>
I will not settle for using a service :-(</blockquote></div><div><br>DNS is hierarchical, so at some point you will have to use a service if you want to be reachable using standard tools.  If you are OK with only being reachable via. TOR or other such things, then you may be able to avoid this... except TOR itself is a service, it&#39;s just not a centrally administered one. And your ISP is a service provider too. <br>

<br>Using a service is not a problem, the problems start when service providers lock you in and degrade your freedom. If there is real, functioning competition in the market (which is certainly the case for DNS and dynamic DNS), then using these services poses no problem.<br>

<br></div><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;"><div><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
For something like a freedom box, which is almost-always online, I don&#39;t really think a secondary MX is going to be necessary. The mail can just sit on the outgoing server until your box becomes available again.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
Now that&#39;s more like it. But I thought you&#39;d get a &quot;Mail delivery subsystem&quot; message saying &#39;can&#39;t deliver&#39; the moment you send it. Are you saying it&#39;s not so, and if yes, how did I miss it?<br>

</blockquote></div><div><br>Not sure how you missed it! You&#39;ll have to tell us! :-)<br><br>Different mail servers behave in different ways.<br><br>Back when I was admining sendmail for an ISP, the &quot;standard&quot; set-up was to have the sending mail server keep trying to deliver for a while, and after 4-6 hours if it still hasn&#39;t succeeded, a warning message was sent to the sender advising them that the e-mail is delayed. After another, longer period of time (commonly 1-5 days) it would give up and return the message to sender as you&#39;ve described.<br>

<br>I don&#39;t know what the common defaults are today, and I don&#39;t know what the big guys (Google, Yahoo etc., Microsoft) do, but I expect it is similar. <br><br>The RFC has a few things to say about this: <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5321#section-4.5.4" target="_blank">http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5321#section-4.5.4</a><br>

</div></div><div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>-- <br>Bjarni R. Einarsson<br><br><a href="http://beanstalks-project.net/" target="_blank">http://beanstalks-project.net/</a><br><a href="http://bre.klaki.net/" target="_blank">http://bre.klaki.net/</a><br>

</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Bjarni R. Einarsson<br><br><a href="http://beanstalks-project.net/">http://beanstalks-project.net/</a><br><a href="http://bre.klaki.net/">http://bre.klaki.net/</a><br>